Support Vector Machine Optimization in Python





Welcome to the 26th part of our machine learning tutorial series and the next part in our Support Vector Machine section. In this tutorial, we're going to be working on our SVM's optimization method: fit.

Where we left off, our code was:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import style
import numpy as np
style.use('ggplot')

class Support_Vector_Machine:
    def __init__(self, visualization=True):
        self.visualization = visualization
        self.colors = {1:'r',-1:'b'}
        if self.visualization:
            self.fig = plt.figure()
            self.ax = self.fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
    # train
    def fit(self, data):
        pass

    def predict(self,features):
        # sign( x.w+b )
        classification = np.sign(np.dot(np.array(features),self.w)+self.b)

        return classification
        
data_dict = {-1:np.array([[1,7],
                          [2,8],
                          [3,8],]),
             
             1:np.array([[5,1],
                         [6,-1],
                         [7,3],])}

We'll begin adding to the fit method:

    def fit(self, data):
        self.data = data
        # { ||w||: [w,b] }
        opt_dict = {}

        transforms = [[1,1],
                      [-1,1],
                      [-1,-1],
                      [1,-1]]

Note that this method is first passing self (remember, just standard to do this with a method), then data is passed. The data is the data we intend to train against / optimize with. In our case, that's going to be data_dict, which we've already created

We set self.data to that data. Now, we can reference the training data anywhere else in the class (but again, we'd have to run the train method first with data for it to work without an error).

Next, we begin building an optimization dictionary as opt_dict, which is going to contain any optimization values. As we step down our w vector, we'll test that vector in our constraint function, finding the largest b, if any, that will satisfy the equation, and then we'll store all of that data in our optimization dictionary. The dictionary will be { ||w|| : [w,b] }. When we're all done optimizing, we'll choose the values of w and b for whichever one in the dictionary has the lowest key value (which is ||w||).

Finally, we set our transforms. We've explained that our intention there is to make sure we check every version of the vector possible.

Next, we need some starting point that matches our data. To do this, we're going to first reference our training data to pick some haflway decent starting values:

        # finding values to work with for our ranges.
        all_data = []
        for yi in self.data:
            for featureset in self.data[yi]:
                for feature in featureset:
                    all_data.append(feature)

        self.max_feature_value = max(all_data)
        self.min_feature_value = min(all_data)
        # no need to keep this memory.
        all_data=None

All we're doing here is cycling through all of our data, and finding the highest and lowest values. Now we're going to work on our step sizes:

        step_sizes = [self.max_feature_value * 0.1,
                      self.max_feature_value * 0.01,
                      # starts getting very high cost after this.
                      self.max_feature_value * 0.001]

What we're doing here is setting some sizes per step that we want to make. For our first pass, we'll take big steps (10%). Once we find the minimum with these steps, we're going to step down to a 1% step size to continue finding the minimum here. Then, one more time, we step down to 0.1% for fine tuning. We could continue stepping down, depending on how precise you want to get. I will discuss towards the end of this project how you could determine within your program whether or not you should continue optimizing or not.

Next, we're going to set some variables that will help us make steps with b (used to make larger steps than we use for w, since we care far more about w precision than b), and keep track of the latest optimal value:

        # extremely expensive
        b_range_multiple = 5
        b_multiple = 5
        latest_optimum = self.max_feature_value*10

Now we're ready to begin stepping:

        for step in step_sizes:
            w = np.array([latest_optimum,latest_optimum])
            # we can do this because convex
            optimized = False
            while not optimized:
                pass

The idea here is to begin stepping down the vector. To begin, we'll set optimized to False, and we'll reset this for each major step. The optimized var will be true when we have checked all steps down to the base of the convex shape (our bowl).

We will pick up with the logic in the next tutorial, where we actually plug in values to the constraint problem to see if we can find values to save.

Full code up to this point:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import style
import numpy as np
style.use('ggplot')

class Support_Vector_Machine:
    def __init__(self, visualization=True):
        self.visualization = visualization
        self.colors = {1:'r',-1:'b'}
        if self.visualization:
            self.fig = plt.figure()
            self.ax = self.fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
    # train
    def fit(self, data):
        self.data = data
        # { ||w||: [w,b] }
        opt_dict = {}

        transforms = [[1,1],
                      [-1,1],
                      [-1,-1],
                      [1,-1]]

        all_data = []
        for yi in self.data:
            for featureset in self.data[yi]:
                for feature in featureset:
                    all_data.append(feature)

        self.max_feature_value = max(all_data)
        self.min_feature_value = min(all_data)
        all_data = None

        step_sizes = [self.max_feature_value * 0.1,
                      self.max_feature_value * 0.01,
                      # point of expense:
                      self.max_feature_value * 0.001,]
        
        # extremely expensive
        b_range_multiple = 5
        # 
        b_multiple = 5
        latest_optimum = self.max_feature_value*10

        for step in step_sizes:
            w = np.array([latest_optimum,latest_optimum])
            # we can do this because convex
            optimized = False
            while not optimized:
                pass
            
    def predict(self,features):
        # sign( x.w+b )
        classification = np.sign(np.dot(np.array(features),self.w)+self.b)

        return classification
        


data_dict = {-1:np.array([[1,7],
                          [2,8],
                          [3,8],]),
             
             1:np.array([[5,1],
                         [6,-1],
                         [7,3],])}

The next tutorial:






  • Practical Machine Learning Tutorial with Python Introduction
  • Regression - Intro and Data
  • Regression - Features and Labels
  • Regression - Training and Testing
  • Regression - Forecasting and Predicting
  • Pickling and Scaling
  • Regression - Theory and how it works
  • Regression - How to program the Best Fit Slope
  • Regression - How to program the Best Fit Line
  • Regression - R Squared and Coefficient of Determination Theory
  • Regression - How to Program R Squared
  • Creating Sample Data for Testing
  • Classification Intro with K Nearest Neighbors
  • Applying K Nearest Neighbors to Data
  • Euclidean Distance theory
  • Creating a K Nearest Neighbors Classifer from scratch
  • Creating a K Nearest Neighbors Classifer from scratch part 2
  • Testing our K Nearest Neighbors classifier
  • Final thoughts on K Nearest Neighbors
  • Support Vector Machine introduction
  • Vector Basics
  • Support Vector Assertions
  • Support Vector Machine Fundamentals
  • Constraint Optimization with Support Vector Machine
  • Beginning SVM from Scratch in Python
  • Support Vector Machine Optimization in Python
  • Support Vector Machine Optimization in Python part 2
  • Visualization and Predicting with our Custom SVM
  • Kernels Introduction
  • Why Kernels
  • Soft Margin Support Vector Machine
  • Kernels, Soft Margin SVM, and Quadratic Programming with Python and CVXOPT
  • Support Vector Machine Parameters
  • Machine Learning - Clustering Introduction
  • Handling Non-Numerical Data for Machine Learning
  • K-Means with Titanic Dataset
  • K-Means from Scratch in Python
  • Finishing K-Means from Scratch in Python
  • Hierarchical Clustering with Mean Shift Introduction
  • Mean Shift applied to Titanic Dataset
  • Mean Shift algorithm from scratch in Python
  • Dynamically Weighted Bandwidth for Mean Shift
  • Introduction to Neural Networks
  • Installing TensorFlow for Deep Learning - OPTIONAL
  • Introduction to Deep Learning with TensorFlow
  • Deep Learning with TensorFlow - Creating the Neural Network Model
  • Deep Learning with TensorFlow - How the Network will run
  • Deep Learning with our own Data
  • Simple Preprocessing Language Data for Deep Learning
  • Training and Testing on our Data for Deep Learning
  • 10K samples compared to 1.6 million samples with Deep Learning
  • How to use CUDA and the GPU Version of Tensorflow for Deep Learning
  • Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) basics and the Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) cell
  • RNN w/ LSTM cell example in TensorFlow and Python
  • Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) basics
  • Convolutional Neural Network CNN with TensorFlow tutorial
  • TFLearn - High Level Abstraction Layer for TensorFlow Tutorial
  • Using a 3D Convolutional Neural Network on medical imaging data (CT Scans) for Kaggle
  • Classifying Cats vs Dogs with a Convolutional Neural Network on Kaggle
  • Using a neural network to solve OpenAI's CartPole balancing environment