Kernels, Soft Margin SVM, and Quadratic Programming with Python and CVXOPT





Welcome to the 32nd part of our machine learning tutorial series and the next part in our Support Vector Machine section. In this tutorial, we're going to show a Python-version of kernels, soft-margin, and solving the quadratic programming problem with CVXOPT.

In this brief section, I am going to mostly be sharing other resources with you, should you want to dig deeper into the SVM or Quadratic Programming in Python with CVXOPT. To start, you can learn more about Quadratic Programming in Python with the CVXOPT Quadratic Programming Docs. You can also check out this CVXOPT Quadratic Programming example.

For a slightly more in depth example of quadratic programming with CVXOPT, you can check out This PDF.

Finally, we're going to get into some code from Mathieu Blondel's Blog that incorporates Kernels, a soft-margin Support Vector Machine, and Quadratic programming with CVXOPT all in code that is better than anything I was going to come up with!

# Mathieu Blondel, September 2010
# License: BSD 3 clause
# http://www.mblondel.org/journal/2010/09/19/support-vector-machines-in-python/

# visualizing what translating to another dimension does
# and bringing back to 2D:
# https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3liCbRZPrZA

# Docs: http://cvxopt.org/userguide/coneprog.html#quadratic-programming
# Docs qp example: http://cvxopt.org/examples/tutorial/qp.html

# Nice tutorial:
# https://courses.csail.mit.edu/6.867/wiki/images/a/a7/Qp-cvxopt.pdf


import numpy as np
from numpy import linalg
import cvxopt
import cvxopt.solvers
             
def linear_kernel(x1, x2):
    return np.dot(x1, x2)

def polynomial_kernel(x, y, p=3):
    return (1 + np.dot(x, y)) ** p

def gaussian_kernel(x, y, sigma=5.0):
    return np.exp(-linalg.norm(x-y)**2 / (2 * (sigma ** 2)))

class SVM(object):

    def __init__(self, kernel=linear_kernel, C=None):
        self.kernel = kernel
        self.C = C
        if self.C is not None: self.C = float(self.C)

    def fit(self, X, y):
        n_samples, n_features = X.shape

        # Gram matrix
        K = np.zeros((n_samples, n_samples))
        for i in range(n_samples):
            for j in range(n_samples):
                K[i,j] = self.kernel(X[i], X[j])

        P = cvxopt.matrix(np.outer(y,y) * K)
        q = cvxopt.matrix(np.ones(n_samples) * -1)
        A = cvxopt.matrix(y, (1,n_samples))
        b = cvxopt.matrix(0.0)

        if self.C is None:
            G = cvxopt.matrix(np.diag(np.ones(n_samples) * -1))
            h = cvxopt.matrix(np.zeros(n_samples))
        else:
            tmp1 = np.diag(np.ones(n_samples) * -1)
            tmp2 = np.identity(n_samples)
            G = cvxopt.matrix(np.vstack((tmp1, tmp2)))
            tmp1 = np.zeros(n_samples)
            tmp2 = np.ones(n_samples) * self.C
            h = cvxopt.matrix(np.hstack((tmp1, tmp2)))

        # solve QP problem
        solution = cvxopt.solvers.qp(P, q, G, h, A, b)

        # Lagrange multipliers
        a = np.ravel(solution['x'])

        # Support vectors have non zero lagrange multipliers
        sv = a > 1e-5
        ind = np.arange(len(a))[sv]
        self.a = a[sv]
        self.sv = X[sv]
        self.sv_y = y[sv]
        print("%d support vectors out of %d points" % (len(self.a), n_samples))

        # Intercept
        self.b = 0
        for n in range(len(self.a)):
            self.b += self.sv_y[n]
            self.b -= np.sum(self.a * self.sv_y * K[ind[n],sv])
        self.b /= len(self.a)

        # Weight vector
        if self.kernel == linear_kernel:
            self.w = np.zeros(n_features)
            for n in range(len(self.a)):
                self.w += self.a[n] * self.sv_y[n] * self.sv[n]
        else:
            self.w = None

    def project(self, X):
        if self.w is not None:
            return np.dot(X, self.w) + self.b
        else:
            y_predict = np.zeros(len(X))
            for i in range(len(X)):
                s = 0
                for a, sv_y, sv in zip(self.a, self.sv_y, self.sv):
                    s += a * sv_y * self.kernel(X[i], sv)
                y_predict[i] = s
            return y_predict + self.b

    def predict(self, X):
        return np.sign(self.project(X))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import pylab as pl

    def gen_lin_separable_data():
        # generate training data in the 2-d case
        mean1 = np.array([0, 2])
        mean2 = np.array([2, 0])
        cov = np.array([[0.8, 0.6], [0.6, 0.8]])
        X1 = np.random.multivariate_normal(mean1, cov, 100)
        y1 = np.ones(len(X1))
        X2 = np.random.multivariate_normal(mean2, cov, 100)
        y2 = np.ones(len(X2)) * -1
        return X1, y1, X2, y2

    def gen_non_lin_separable_data():
        mean1 = [-1, 2]
        mean2 = [1, -1]
        mean3 = [4, -4]
        mean4 = [-4, 4]
        cov = [[1.0,0.8], [0.8, 1.0]]
        X1 = np.random.multivariate_normal(mean1, cov, 50)
        X1 = np.vstack((X1, np.random.multivariate_normal(mean3, cov, 50)))
        y1 = np.ones(len(X1))
        X2 = np.random.multivariate_normal(mean2, cov, 50)
        X2 = np.vstack((X2, np.random.multivariate_normal(mean4, cov, 50)))
        y2 = np.ones(len(X2)) * -1
        return X1, y1, X2, y2

    def gen_lin_separable_overlap_data():
        # generate training data in the 2-d case
        mean1 = np.array([0, 2])
        mean2 = np.array([2, 0])
        cov = np.array([[1.5, 1.0], [1.0, 1.5]])
        X1 = np.random.multivariate_normal(mean1, cov, 100)
        y1 = np.ones(len(X1))
        X2 = np.random.multivariate_normal(mean2, cov, 100)
        y2 = np.ones(len(X2)) * -1
        return X1, y1, X2, y2

    def split_train(X1, y1, X2, y2):
        X1_train = X1[:90]
        y1_train = y1[:90]
        X2_train = X2[:90]
        y2_train = y2[:90]
        X_train = np.vstack((X1_train, X2_train))
        y_train = np.hstack((y1_train, y2_train))
        return X_train, y_train

    def split_test(X1, y1, X2, y2):
        X1_test = X1[90:]
        y1_test = y1[90:]
        X2_test = X2[90:]
        y2_test = y2[90:]
        X_test = np.vstack((X1_test, X2_test))
        y_test = np.hstack((y1_test, y2_test))
        return X_test, y_test

    def plot_margin(X1_train, X2_train, clf):
        def f(x, w, b, c=0):
            # given x, return y such that [x,y] in on the line
            # w.x + b = c
            return (-w[0] * x - b + c) / w[1]

        pl.plot(X1_train[:,0], X1_train[:,1], "ro")
        pl.plot(X2_train[:,0], X2_train[:,1], "bo")
        pl.scatter(clf.sv[:,0], clf.sv[:,1], s=100, c="g")

        # w.x + b = 0
        a0 = -4; a1 = f(a0, clf.w, clf.b)
        b0 = 4; b1 = f(b0, clf.w, clf.b)
        pl.plot([a0,b0], [a1,b1], "k")

        # w.x + b = 1
        a0 = -4; a1 = f(a0, clf.w, clf.b, 1)
        b0 = 4; b1 = f(b0, clf.w, clf.b, 1)
        pl.plot([a0,b0], [a1,b1], "k--")

        # w.x + b = -1
        a0 = -4; a1 = f(a0, clf.w, clf.b, -1)
        b0 = 4; b1 = f(b0, clf.w, clf.b, -1)
        pl.plot([a0,b0], [a1,b1], "k--")

        pl.axis("tight")
        pl.show()

    def plot_contour(X1_train, X2_train, clf):
        pl.plot(X1_train[:,0], X1_train[:,1], "ro")
        pl.plot(X2_train[:,0], X2_train[:,1], "bo")
        pl.scatter(clf.sv[:,0], clf.sv[:,1], s=100, c="g")

        X1, X2 = np.meshgrid(np.linspace(-6,6,50), np.linspace(-6,6,50))
        X = np.array([[x1, x2] for x1, x2 in zip(np.ravel(X1), np.ravel(X2))])
        Z = clf.project(X).reshape(X1.shape)
        pl.contour(X1, X2, Z, [0.0], colors='k', linewidths=1, origin='lower')
        pl.contour(X1, X2, Z + 1, [0.0], colors='grey', linewidths=1, origin='lower')
        pl.contour(X1, X2, Z - 1, [0.0], colors='grey', linewidths=1, origin='lower')

        pl.axis("tight")
        pl.show()

    def test_linear():
        X1, y1, X2, y2 = gen_lin_separable_data()
        X_train, y_train = split_train(X1, y1, X2, y2)
        X_test, y_test = split_test(X1, y1, X2, y2)

        clf = SVM()
        clf.fit(X_train, y_train)

        y_predict = clf.predict(X_test)
        correct = np.sum(y_predict == y_test)
        print("%d out of %d predictions correct" % (correct, len(y_predict)))

        plot_margin(X_train[y_train==1], X_train[y_train==-1], clf)

    def test_non_linear():
        X1, y1, X2, y2 = gen_non_lin_separable_data()
        X_train, y_train = split_train(X1, y1, X2, y2)
        X_test, y_test = split_test(X1, y1, X2, y2)

        clf = SVM(polynomial_kernel)
        clf.fit(X_train, y_train)

        y_predict = clf.predict(X_test)
        correct = np.sum(y_predict == y_test)
        print("%d out of %d predictions correct" % (correct, len(y_predict)))

        plot_contour(X_train[y_train==1], X_train[y_train==-1], clf)

    def test_soft():
        X1, y1, X2, y2 = gen_lin_separable_overlap_data()
        X_train, y_train = split_train(X1, y1, X2, y2)
        X_test, y_test = split_test(X1, y1, X2, y2)

        clf = SVM(C=1000.1)
        clf.fit(X_train, y_train)

        y_predict = clf.predict(X_test)
        correct = np.sum(y_predict == y_test)
        print("%d out of %d predictions correct" % (correct, len(y_predict)))

        plot_contour(X_train[y_train==1], X_train[y_train==-1], clf)

        
    #test_linear()
    #test_non_linear()
    test_soft()

If you would like to see me running through the code, you can check out the associated video. Mainly, I will just mention that you will likely never actually need to use CVXOPT. The library that most people use for the Support Vector Machine optimization is LibSVM.

All of that said, this code is moreso meant to give you an understanding of the inner workings, not so much for you to actually create a robust Support Vector Machine beyond what is already available to you for free.

In the next tutorial, we're going to run through one more concept with the Support Vector Machine, which is what to do when you have more than two groups to classify. We will also run through all of the parameters of the SVM from Scikit-Learn in summary, since we've covered quite a bit on this topic overall.


There exists 1 quiz/question(s) for this tutorial. for access to these, video downloads, and no ads.

The next tutorial:






  • Practical Machine Learning Tutorial with Python Introduction
  • Regression - Intro and Data
  • Regression - Features and Labels
  • Regression - Training and Testing
  • Regression - Forecasting and Predicting
  • Pickling and Scaling
  • Regression - Theory and how it works
  • Regression - How to program the Best Fit Slope
  • Regression - How to program the Best Fit Line
  • Regression - R Squared and Coefficient of Determination Theory
  • Regression - How to Program R Squared
  • Creating Sample Data for Testing
  • Classification Intro with K Nearest Neighbors
  • Applying K Nearest Neighbors to Data
  • Euclidean Distance theory
  • Creating a K Nearest Neighbors Classifer from scratch
  • Creating a K Nearest Neighbors Classifer from scratch part 2
  • Testing our K Nearest Neighbors classifier
  • Final thoughts on K Nearest Neighbors
  • Support Vector Machine introduction
  • Vector Basics
  • Support Vector Assertions
  • Support Vector Machine Fundamentals
  • Constraint Optimization with Support Vector Machine
  • Beginning SVM from Scratch in Python
  • Support Vector Machine Optimization in Python
  • Support Vector Machine Optimization in Python part 2
  • Visualization and Predicting with our Custom SVM
  • Kernels Introduction
  • Why Kernels
  • Soft Margin Support Vector Machine
  • Kernels, Soft Margin SVM, and Quadratic Programming with Python and CVXOPT
  • Support Vector Machine Parameters
  • Machine Learning - Clustering Introduction
  • Handling Non-Numerical Data for Machine Learning
  • K-Means with Titanic Dataset
  • K-Means from Scratch in Python
  • Finishing K-Means from Scratch in Python
  • Hierarchical Clustering with Mean Shift Introduction
  • Mean Shift applied to Titanic Dataset
  • Mean Shift algorithm from scratch in Python
  • Dynamically Weighted Bandwidth for Mean Shift
  • Introduction to Neural Networks
  • Installing TensorFlow for Deep Learning - OPTIONAL
  • Introduction to Deep Learning with TensorFlow
  • Deep Learning with TensorFlow - Creating the Neural Network Model
  • Deep Learning with TensorFlow - How the Network will run
  • Deep Learning with our own Data
  • Simple Preprocessing Language Data for Deep Learning
  • Training and Testing on our Data for Deep Learning
  • 10K samples compared to 1.6 million samples with Deep Learning
  • How to use CUDA and the GPU Version of Tensorflow for Deep Learning
  • Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) basics and the Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) cell
  • RNN w/ LSTM cell example in TensorFlow and Python
  • Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) basics
  • Convolutional Neural Network CNN with TensorFlow tutorial
  • TFLearn - High Level Abstraction Layer for TensorFlow Tutorial
  • Using a 3D Convolutional Neural Network on medical imaging data (CT Scans) for Kaggle
  • Classifying Cats vs Dogs with a Convolutional Neural Network on Kaggle
  • Using a neural network to solve OpenAI's CartPole balancing environment